Author Archives: Catherine Jones

Jones_Mobilewebsite

 

jones-catie-mobilewebsite jones_updated-desktop-website

The first file is my mobile website design, and the second is my  desktop file. I updated the colors in the  mobile design to make it more professional and to help the content flow from one topic to the next. The designs are for The Representation Project, a nonprofit that created and screens documentaries about the negative representations about women and men in media.

 

Jones_DesktopWebsite

My website design for a desktop computer.

My website design for a desktop computer.

I designed a desktop website for The Representation Project, a nonprofit organization that brings attention to harmful and stereotypical media representations of women and men using two different documentaries: “Miss Representation” and “The Mask You Live In.” It is an organization and cause that I’ve always cared about, so I enjoyed getting to reinvent the website! You can find more information about the nonprofit here.

Jones_Magazine

jones-catie-magazine

jones-catie-magazine2

 

I chose to design a magazine spread about LC-130 Hercules, a special type of tanker that has skis for landing on ice and snow. These planes are used in Antarctica to supply researchers with supplies. I have a personal connection because my mom used to be an Air Force pilot and flew these planes to Antarctica. It was fun to learn more about the 109th Air Lift Wing’s mission while designing the spreads.

Jones_Poster

360 Swap & Shop Poster

360 Swap & Shop Poster for Target and Good360

My event is the “360 Swap & Shop,” a giant, women-only clothing swap sponsored by Target. There is no entrance fee, but all attendees are required to bring at least two items of clothing: one item to donate to Good360 (the nonprofit) and one item to swap.

All of the swap-designated clothing will be organized in one area, where attendees will select the items they want on a first-come, first-serve basis. The more items someone brings, the more items they can take home. There will also be a Target wardrobe raffle worth $1,000. Attendees will receive one raffle ticket for each clothing item they donate to Good360, so there is equal incentive to donate clothes.

I addressed the needs of the clients, Target and Good360, by combining unique artwork and a strong headline for an eye-catching appeal. I communicated the need, donated clothes, through the empty clothes hangers and call to action, “Give your old clothes new life.” I also advertised the 360 Swap & Shop right below the headline, so the audience quickly learns how to participate.

Several aspects of this event would attract someone to attend:

  • You can get rid of unused clothes.
  • You can bring home free, new clothes.
  • You can help someone in need by donating.
  • You can win a Target wardrobe.

My audience is all women ages 13 and older, especially those who like to shop. My poster addresses this demographic by using bright, feminine colors (light blue, yellow, and purple) and modern, clean font (Ostrich Sans and Cicle). It also uses a familiar object, hangers, in a new way to catch their attention.

In terms of the design, the large, bright headline should attract attention first and lead the eye up to the flying hangers/birds. I chose yellow to help the words stand out. The vertically-oriented Ostrich Sans text also complements the idea of flying upward. The yellows, purples, and whites are distributed throughout to unify the poster and make it visually interesting. I chose blue for the background to signify the sky, while the yellow and purple are complementary colors that add pop against the background.

Jones_ExpressiveType

Expressive Type - Catie Jones

I chose the verb “hiccup” because of its potential for letter motion (and because I recently suffered a marathon case of the hiccups). The formality of the Caslon typeface provided a fun contrast to the playfulness of the “cc” segment.

Hiccups can temporarily discombobulate even the most serious of situations and behaviors. Thus, the beginning and end of the word are untouched, while the middle letters bounce up just enough to indicate a passing hiccup.

All of the letters are lowercase to convey that hiccups are minor, normal inconveniences; they are not significant enough for capital letters.

Found Typography – Catie Jones

 

The Crouse College building at Syracuse University.

The Crouse College building at Syracuse University.

I discovered the alphabet while roaming across campus, my neighborhood, my apartment, and my friend’s pool. This assignment helped me appreciate just how many hidden treasures there are in plain sight, when we simply choose to be observant and creative. This “J” stood out to me in particular because, even though I’ve seen the famous Crouse building multiple times, I have never interpreted it as a letter. Usually I’m taking in the whole building, not just one element of it. This exercise especially helped me focus on portions of whole objects for capturing messages—from sunglasses, to the veins in a leaf, to the handle on a coffee mug. The alphabet is everywhere!

The remainder of my alphabet is in the Found Typography folder on my Flickr page.